Category:Region 5 ~ Eastern England

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The Eastern Region comprises of 7 counties, namely Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and Essex.


The co-ordinators for the region are:








Interesting facts from the Eastern region:

St Peter's Chapel in Bradwell, Essex, was built in 654 by St. Cedd and is believed to the the oldest Christian Church still in regular use in England.

Lowestoft Ness in Suffolk is the most easterly point in Britain, whilst Holme Fen, Cambridgeshire, is the lowest land point at 2.75 metres below sea level.

It was in Lavenham, Suffolk, that poet Jane Taylor wrote the nursery rhyme Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.

Houghton Hall, near Kings Lynn, Norfolk, houses an exhibition of 20,000 model soldiers, believed to be the largest collection in the world.

The door of St. Botolphs Church in Hadstock, Essex, is over 1,000 years old.

The round tower of St. Andrew's Church in East Lexham, Suffolk, is over 1,000 years old and believed to be the oldest saxon tower in England.

The head of Oliver Cromwell is buried in an unmarked grave in the Sidney Sussex College Chapel, Cambridge.

The Tide Mill at Woodbridge, Suffolk, built in 1792 is the only remaining working tide mill in Britain.

The Old Ferry Boat Inn in Holywell, St. Ives, Cambridgeshire, has been serving alcohol since the year 560, making it Britain's oldest inn still in use.

It was in Dunstable Priory, Bedfordshire, that the divorce between Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon was formalised.

The first paper mill in Britain was built in Hertford by John Tate c1490. Paper from John Tate's mill was used to print Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

The Octagon in Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire, is the only gothic dome in the world.

Henry VIII wife Katherine of Aragon was burried in Peterborough Cathedral in 1536. Her grave can still be seen there today.

Mary Queen of Scots was also buried in Peterborough Cathedral following her execution at nearby Fortheringhay Castle.

Peterborough is the home of Britain's Flag Fen Bronze Age Centre.